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Man of La Mancha

Not Seen on Our Stage in 20 Years!
October 7 - 30, 2016 

Book by: Dale Wasserman
Music by: Mitch Leigh
Lyrics by: Joe Darion
Directed by: Allison Narver

One of the most epic and enduring musicals of all time, Man of La Mancha is a glorious affirmation of the unyielding resilience of the human spirit that will leave you breathless.

Inspired by one of the greatest novels in Western literature, Man of La Mancha enters the mind and world of the mad knight Don Quixote as he pursues his quest for the impossible dream. In a tale told by Cervantes himself in defense of his life’s work, Quixote is, against all odds, a man who sees good and innocence in a world filled with darkness and despair.

Featuring stirring classic songs including “The Impossible Dream,” Man of La Mancha is a multi-Tony Award®-winning theatrical masterpiece that blurs the line between dreams and reality in a powerful celebration of the imagination.

 

Disney’s The Little Mermaid

Disney’s Classic Brought to Life
November 23 - December 31

Music by: Alan Menken
Lyrics by Howard Ashman & Glenn Slater
Book by: Doug Wright
Directed by: Glenn Casale

This holiday season, join us “Under the Sea” at The 5th Avenue Theatre for this spectacular production of the Broadway musical, Disney’s The Little Mermaid. Headstrong Ariel is no longer content to live on the ocean floor under her father, King Triton’s, rule. Convinced she’ll only find happiness on land, she sets off to find a world where she belongs, battling a sea witch and finding true love along the way.

Adults and children alike will revel in the Academy Award®-winning hits by the legendary Alan Menken including “Kiss the Girl” and “Part of Your World.” This spectacular new production will feature dazzling costumes, a stunning pop-up book inspired set and visual effects that are pure magic. So trade in your fleece for flippers this winter and make Disney’s The Little Mermaid part of your world.

 

The Pajama Game

First Time at The 5th!
February 9 - March 5, 2017

Music & lyrics by: Richard Adler & Jerry Ross
Book by: George Abbott & Richard Bissell
Based on the novel 7 ½ cents by: Richard Bissell
Directed by: Bill Berry

Things are getting steamy at the Sleep Tite Pajama factory where handsome new superintendent Sid Sorokin is falling hard for Babe Williams, the all-too-alluring union rep. But sparks really fly when the workers go on strike for a 7½-cent pay raise, setting off not only a conflict between management and labor, but a battle of the sexes as well.

The show that defined Fosse style with seductive dance numbers such as “Steam Heat” and “Hernando’s Hideaway,” this critically acclaimed musical won three Tony Awards® including Best Choreography and Best Musical. The swinging score includes the timeless hits “Hey There (You with The Stars in Your Eyes)” and “There Once Was a Man” performed by a sensational Seattle cast. Don’t miss The Pajama Game done as only The 5th can do it.

 

 

Murder for Two

Northwest Premiere!
A Co-Production with ACT - A Contemporary Theatre
March 25 - June 11, 2017

Book by: Joe Kinosian & Kellen Blair
Lyrics by: Kellen Blair
Music by: Joe Kinosian

Get ready for a musical comedy to die for!

Everyone is a suspect in Murder for Two—a drop-dead funny murder mystery musical with a twist: One actor investigates the crime; the other plays all the suspects—and they both play the piano! A zany blend of classic musical comedy and madcap mystery, this ninety-minute whodunit is a highly theatrical duet loaded with killer laughs. Called “Ingenious” by The New York Times, Murder for Two is the perfect blend of murder, music and mayhem!

 

The Secret Garden

A Co-Production with D.C.’s The Shakespeare Theatre Company
April 14 - May 6, 2017

Book & lyrics by: Marsha Norman
Music by: Lucy Simon
Directed by: David Armstrong
Based on the novel by: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Welcome to the hauntingly beautiful world of The Secret Garden, where hope is found blooming in the discovery of a magical garden long locked-away. Based on the beloved novel, The Secret Garden follows recently orphaned ten year old Mary Lennox, who is sent to live with her reclusive uncle in a crumbling mansion on the Yorkshire moors. When she discovers the key to a neglected garden, Mary renews life for herself and her sickly cousin, bringing the weary estate and its occupants back to exuberant life with the full force of spring.

With book and lyrics by Pulitzer Prize-winner Marsha Norman and music by Lucy Simon, this captivating show will mesmerize audiences of all ages and transport you to a world where beauty and love blossom, and a forgotten seed of life can still flourish.

 

Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion

World Premiere!
June 8 - July 2, 2017

Music & lyrics by: Gwendolyn Sanford & Brandon Jay
Book by: Robin Schiff
Directed by: Kristin Hanggi
Choreographed by: Kelly Devine

Two of the quirkiest and most endearing best friends in pop culture will make their musical theater debut at The 5th Avenue Theatre this season. Join us at the world premiere of the totally awesome new musical, Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion, based on the 1997 cult hit film. Romy and Michele are two inseparable best friends whose relationship is put to the test when they invent fake careers to impress people at their 10-year high school reunion.

Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion features a creative team including Rock of Ages’ Kristin Hanggi and Kelly Devine, as well as a book by the film’s screenwriter, Robin Schiff. With an all new ‘80s and ‘90s pop-rock-inspired score, Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion is totally, like, the coolest thing since the invention of Post-its®.

 

Fun Home

2015 Tony Award® Winner
July 11 - 30, 2017

Music by: Jeanine Tesori
Book & lyrics by: Lisa Kron
Based on the graphic novel by: Alison Bechdel
Directed by: Sam Gold

Every once in a while a Broadway musical comes along that surprises, moves and excites audiences in ways only a truly landmark musical can. The “groundbreaking,” “life-affirming” and “exquisite” new musical Fun Home was the event of the Broadway season, receiving raves from critics and audiences alike, winning five 2015 Tony Awards including BEST MUSICAL and making history along the way. Based on Alison Bechdel’s best-selling graphic memoir, Fun Home introduces us to Alison at three different ages as she explores and unravels the many mysteries of her childhood. A refreshingly honest musical about seeing your parents through grown-up eyes, “Fun Home is extraordinary, a rare beauty that pumps fresh air into Broadway.” (New York Times).

 

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Subscriber Benefits

  • Free Exchanges - Something comes up and you can’t make your night? No problem…. We’ll exchange your tickets to a date that works for you with no fee. It’s stress free!
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  • Invitations to Special Subscriber-Only Events
 

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Special Subscription Packages

The 5th Avenue Theatre offers a variety of special subscription options:

  • Thank Goodness It’s Friday (TGIF) Preview Package

    Brand new for the 2016/17 season is our TGIF subscription package. We’ve created a totally fresh 5 show subscription at an amazing price! There are 5 Friday night preview performances in the 2016/17 season and TGIF subscribers can enjoy them all for only $144—a $237 savings. Learn more now.

  • Under 35 for $36

    Are you 35 or under and looking for a fun weeknight activity? Come down to The 5th Avenue Theatre in the heart of bustling downtown Seattle and take in some culture at our beautiful historic theatre.  Surrounded by some of the best restaurants and bars in the city, guests have many varied options for an affordable happy hour or luxurious dinner before each performance. Subscribe on a Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday or Sunday evening for only $36 (includes facility fee) per show with all the standard subscriber benefits! 

  • Silver Subscribers

    Are you age 65 or over? We are pleased to offer a discounted rate to our fans to join us for a dedicated matinee performance on select Thursday afternoons. Subscribe to our Thursday Silver Matinee series and save big.

  • Accessible Subscriptions

    5th Avenue guests with sight, hearing, or physical limitations are still able to enjoy the lush productions on stage at The 5th. We have ASL interpreted performances, audio described performances, and special seating sections available. Click here to learn about Accessible Subscriptions.

Subscriber benefits include:

  • Early On-Sale Access - Enjoy exclusive subscriber pre-sales for single tickets to all shows.
  • Lock in the Best Prices - As a show approaches, ticket prices increase. Secure the best seats at the best prices, early.
  • Discounted Parking for subscribers!
  • 25% Savings on Additional Tickets
  • Invitations to Special Subscriber-Only Events

These special subscription packages may only be purchased by phone. For more information, please call the Box Office at 206-625-1900.

 

2016/17 Season Seating Chart

 
 

Some shows deal with mature themes and may not be appropriate for all children. For information about whether a particular show is suitable for your child, we strongly encourage you to read the Content Advisories for each production listed below. Children under 4, including babes in arms, will not be admitted. 

2016/17 Content Guidelines

Man of La Mancha

Rating: PG-13

Man of La Mancha is set in the common room of a stone prison vault in Seville, Spain; it is the late sixteenth century. Miguel de Cervantes, the author of Don Quixote, has been arrested by the Inquisition and confined among thieves and murderers to await his trial. To recover his manuscript (which has been confiscated by the other prisoners), Cervantes and his manservant offer to enact the story of the mad knight.

 

Adult Language:

The language is mild; a couple of “hells” are heard and one “bastard.” Aldonza yells at the muleteers, “Sons of whores!” when they steal a letter from her knight. Pedro later yells, “Back, whore!” at her when she tries to help Don Quixote in a fight.

 

Sexual References:

The tavern maid, Aldonza, is seen being manhandled by the rough muleteers who patronize the inn; she pushes them away and reminds them that she needs payment in advance. She sings: “I do not like you or your brother / I do not like the life I live / But I am me, I am Aldonza, and what I give / I choose to give.” Finally, she accepts a bag of coins from Pedro. When Don Quixote addresses her as his lady, the muleteers mock her.

The muleteers singing “Little Bird” make some casual passes at Aldonza as she fills buckets with water for the horses; she pulls away from them.

A Moorish girl approaches Don Quixote performing a lascivious dance; although Sancho protests that she is “a trollop,” Don Quixote addresses her as “sweet maiden,” and when she places his hands on her breasts, asserts that “She wishes me to feel the beating of her heart.”

 

Alcohol/Drugs:

The muleteers are seen drinking ale in the inn.

 

Violence:

In the opening scene, the prisoners leap on Cervantes and his manservant, knocking them to the ground and taking every possession they carry; the governor, the leader of the prisoners, intervenes.

Pedro slaps Aldonza and sends her spinning to the ground; Don Quixote is outraged, and, with Aldonza’s and Sancho’s help, he fights the muleteers.

After their defeat by Don Quixote, the angry muleteers attack Aldonza; in a stylized and choreographed scene, she is beaten and brutalized. She loses consciousness and is carried off. When she is seen again, her face is bruised, her hair matted, her clothing in tatters.

 

Disney's The Little Mermaid

Rating: PG

The Little Mermaid is based on the 1989 Walt Disney movie. It is appropriate for audiences of all ages and contains no adult language or sexual references.

 

Adult Language: None

 

Sexual References: None

 

Alcohol/Drugs: None

 

Violence/Scariness:

The villainess, Ursula, is an evil Octopus-like creature with eight floating tentacles. At one point, she grabs the tails of her two henchmen (Flotsam and Jetsam, electric eels) and touches them together, making them sizzle and yelp. Ursula’s song “Daddy’s Little Angel” tells the tale of how she got rid of her 7 sisters to become queen (until her brother Triton supplanted her).

King Triton blames humans (with their hooks and their spears) for the death of Ariel’s mother, who went out swimming one day and never returned.

 

The Pajama Game

Rating: PG

Adult Language:

The language is very mild: a couple of “hells” (“Seven and a half cents doesn’t buy a helluva lot” goes one lyric) and “damns” (“This is a lot of damned nonsense!”), plus one vulgar expression (“I don’t have to take that crap from nobody!”).

 

Sexual References:

Several of the lyrics contain sexual innuendos, but are not explicit (“I got a hot water bottle / But nothing I got’ll / Take the place of you”). Some dance moves (in “Steam Heat” and the tango “Hernando’s Hideaway”) are also mildly suggestive.

Intimacy between the characters is also implied rather than explicit: for instance, as they sing “Small Talk,” Sid tries to kiss Babe, who insists she must cook dinner. She discovers her aprons are in the wash, removes her dress, and puts on a pajama top over her slip. They kiss again and sink into a chair as the lights go down.

One character (“Prez”) is a married man who constantly flirts with his female co-workers, using the same lines on all of them; he is usually unsuccessful, although he is seen leaving the company picnic with Mae (who later dumps him when he leaves her to go home to his wife).

 

Alcohol/Drugs:

Characters are seen drinking beer at the company picnic, at a tavern, and during a union meeting. Hines has a drinking problem and arrives at the factory inebriated when he believes his girlfriend has been unfaithful.

 

Violence/Scariness:

Sid shoves a worker who is being deliberately slow. Another character (Hines) entertains his co-workers with a knife-throwing performance at a picnic and later throws knives at several characters while drunk and in a jealous rage (he misses). The knives are not actually thrown onstage (though they seem to be).

 

Murder for Two

Rating: PG

Murder for Two is an uproarious comedy/murder mystery with two performers, one of whom portrays aspiring detective Marcus Moscowicz, while the other plays all ten suspects.

 

Adult Language:

The language is very mild. A couple of “hells” are heard.

 

Sexual References:

A married couple (Barb and Murray, both played by the same actor) fight: she yells at him, “At least I don’t have a small penis!” Barrette, the ballerina, confesses that she had an affair with the victim, infuriating his wife Dahlia (“I thought so, especially those nights when she joined us in bed! But this confirms it!”).

 

Alcohol/Drugs: None

 

Violence:

A gunshot is heard at the opening, and the victim, novelist Arthur Whitney, is dead, shot in the forehead (the body cannot be seen, though the players refer to it). Officer Moscowicz tells a story about his former lover, Vanessa, who turned out to be a serial killer (she is caught carrying a briefcase of body parts); one character is poisoned onstage (these moments are played for laughs rather than horror). 

 

The Secret Garden

Rating: PG

The Secret Garden, based on the classic children’s book by Frances Hodgson Burnett (The Little Princess), tells the story of Mary Lennox, a 10-year-old girl suddenly orphaned in India, who is sent to her uncle’s mysterious house in the moors of Yorkshire.

 

Adult Language: None

 

Sexual References: None

 

Alcohol/Drugs: None

 

Violence/Scariness:

The show opens with Mary going to bed in her room as her parents host a party in the rooms below; when she wakes in the morning, her family, the guests, and the household servants have all died of cholera (this is conveyed only symbolically onstage as the characters dance passing a red handkerchief and drop out of the game one by one). These characters – along with Mary’s Aunt Lily, who died in childbirth – are “The Dreamers,” whose songs comment on the action; shadows from the past, they haunt those still alive who are grieving. At one point, Mary asks her uncle, “Is my Aunt Lily a ghost now? Does everyone who dies become a ghost?” He replies, “They’re only a ghost if someone alive is still holding onto them.”

At one point, Mary accuses her uncle’s brother Dr. Craven of not wanting her sickly cousin Colin to get well: “You want him to die so you can have this house!” Dr. Craven raises his hand to hit her, but controls himself and sends her from the room.

 

Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion

Rating: PG-13

Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion is a new musical based on the 1997 film. Please note that because this is a new script, there will be some changes made throughout the show’s run.

Romy and Michele, who graduated from high school in 1987, planned to attend their reunion until they realized that in ten years they have accomplished very little – how can they impress the popular girls? And how will Romy finally attract the man of her dreams – Billy, the captain of the high school football team?

 

Adult Language:

A couple of “damns” are heard and one exclamation of “Jesus!” “Screw” is heard a couple of times, but never in a sexual sense (“Screw these people!”). One character is called a “dickhead” and another a “credit whore” (for stealing someone else’s idea). Heather, who is thoroughly disillusioned with relationships, sings “Love is . . . ,” which uses the word “bullshit” twelve times. A few vulgar expressions are also used (examples: “Stop jerking off,” “He is such a douchebag,” “You’re shittin’ me,” “asshole”).

 

Sexual References:

When Romy and Michele dance together (since no one else asked), Romy observes, “Sometimes I wish I was a lesbian.” When Michele jokingly asks if they should try it, she says the idea “creeps me out,” but “if we’re not married by the time we’re thirty, ask me again.” Later the two of them will discuss who lost her virginity first.

In a flashback at Sagebrush High School, the popular girls/cheerleaders dance while singing their inner thoughts: “I’m the best, the luckiest / You wish that you could touch my breast / But all you get to do is watch me,” while the boys voice their own longings: “How I wish I could see them naked!”

In a dream sequence, Michele sees Romy sitting on a (shirtless) Billy’s lap; they are making out.

In an interview at a department store, Michele uses the “jerk off” hand motion to describe how she can convince customers they look good in anything.

Two characters who have fallen in love disappear together into the dressing room of a boutique. We do not see them emerge.

 

Alcohol/Drugs:

Heather, Romy and Michele’s high school classmate, is seen smoking both in flashbacks set in “Sagebrush High School” and at the reunion ten years later.

Attendees at the reunion are seen drinking beer; a few are seen smoking marijuana. One character is revealed to be “sloppy drunk.”

 

Violence: None.

 

Fun Home

Fun Home, the winner of the 2015 Tony Award for Best Musical, is based on the graphic novel of the same name by Alison Bechdel ; she subtitled her book – a memoir about her very unusual childhood and her relationship with her parents – “a family tragicomic.” The author is played by three actresses who portray Small Alison (around nine years old), Medium Alison (19 and a college freshman), and Alison (43 and a cartoonist). Both funny and very moving (Variety observed, “This show could be staged on the back of a truck and still break your heart”), Fun Home contains adult content which is described below.

Rating: PG-13

 

Adult Language:

The “f” word is heard six times, always from Alison’s father Bruce during his unpredictable explosions of anger (“Don’t f—g tell me what to do!” “No one f—g helps around here!”); he also calls his wife a “crazy bitch.”  Also heard are a couple of “damnits!,” one “Goddammit!” and one “Christ! Chrissakes!” A few vulgar expressions are used (“bullshit,” “shitload”).

 

Sexual References:

Medium Alison discovers she is a lesbian from reading a book (Word is Out, interviews with 26 lesbians and gay men, a companion to the 1978 film). When she claims to be nonetheless asexual, her friend Joan kisses her; they tumble into bed together and the lights go down. Joan is then seen sleeping while Alison sings “Changing my Major” (“I’m changing my major to sex with Joan / With a minor in kissing Joan / Foreign study to Joan’s inner thighs / A seminar on Joan’s ass in her levis / And Joan’s crazy brown eyes”).

Bruce is seen asking Roy, a former student assisting him, to unbutton his shirt; Roy does so, singing, “I know this type / This type of married guy / I could just give him the slip but why / It’s not a big deal.” Later we see Bruce talking with Mark, a 16-year-old student: “I just like getting the chance to know you a little better. You got yourself a girl?” The relationships in these scenes are implied onstage, not explicit.

When Medium Alison comes out to her parents (in a letter), Helen responds by informing her daughter about Bruce (“Days and days and days / made of posing and bragging and fits of rage / and boys, my god, some of them underage / And oh how did it all happen here?”).

 

Alcohol/Drugs:

Bruce offers sherry to Roy; later he offers a beer to Mark, a high school junior. Joan offers a joint to Medium Alison when she has heard upsetting news. Helen pours wine for herself and Medium Alison before they discuss the truth about Bruce.

Violence/Scariness:

Bruce (high school teacher, amateur historic home restorer, funeral director) calls Small Alison into the room where he is working on a cadaver and asks her to hand him some scissors. (Alison at 43 wonders: “Is this the way your father showed you your first dead body? Was it a Bechdel rite of passage? Or am I reading too much into this? Maybe you just wanted the scissors.”) The three small Bechdel children devise a mock commercial (“Come to the Fun Home”) for the family business; they dance on the caskets in the showroom and hide inside one when their father interrupts them.

Small Alison hears her parents, Bruce and Helen, fighting; they shout at each other and sometimes throw objects. At one point, Bruce begins tearing pages out of books.

 

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